Headlines: Poker, Law, and Politics (11/01/07)

deval_110107.jpg


articles:

Illegal gambling ring busted by Stamford police (The Stamford Times, 10/31/07)

Officials say they can’t predict gambling’s social costs (Boston Globe, 11/01/07)

Candidates gambling on casino issue, but voters get last say (WFIE, 10/31/07)

Poker grows at area tracks, but racing handle drops (Tampa Bay Business Journal, 10/31/07)

Oregon and D.C.: The Odds Couple (Willamette Week, 10/31/07)

Analysis – PartyGaming seen as unlikely target for US casino players in coming years due to UIGEA, outstanding legal issues (Financial Times, 10/30/07)

Duplicate poker has arrived (The Desert Sun, 11/01/07)

Sin Cities on a Hill (Reason, 10/2006)

media:
Patrick Defends Casino Proposal (WCVR-TV, 10/31/07)

excerpts:
Illegal gambling ring busted by Stamford police (The Stamford Times, 10/31/07)
“The poker games were considered illegal because the house kept a percentage of the money put into the poker game. Low wage poker games between parties who can prove a relationship between one another are legal in Connecticut. Police are looking into the gambling operation’s possible ties to organized crime.”

Officials say they can’t predict gambling’s social costs (Boston Globe, 11/01/07)
“Botticelli, Health and Human Services Secretary JudyAnn Bigby, and Public Health Commissioner John Auerbach defended Patrick’s proposal yesterday, saying the state would mitigate social problems by setting aside millions of dollars to fight gambling addiction. “The bill includes some of the most aggressive funding and regulatory structures of any state in the country to make sure that we are able to prevent and mitigate the potential negative impact of gambling in Massachusetts,” Bigby said.”

Candidates gambling on casino issue, but voters get last say (WFIE, 10/31/07)
“The Kentucky governor’s race has at times mirrored a high-stakes poker game. Governor Fletcher and Democratic challenger Steve Beshear bet the house – or at least their campaigns – on whether the state should legalize casino gambling. Fletcher opposes the idea, while Beshear says that as governor he’ll work to pass a constitutional amendment that would clear a path for casinos.”

Poker grows at area tracks, but racing handle drops (Tampa Bay Business Journal, 10/31/07)
“Neither Tampa Greyhound nor Tampa Bay Downs had card rooms open last year because the old regulations required live racing to operate the poker rooms. The new law passed last July allows year-round card rooms with higher limits. Card rooms have prospered under the new rules with receipts growing 76.6 percent in September, but the added revenue still hasn’t offset the declining state of pari-mutual racing.”

Oregon and D.C.: The Odds Couple (Willamette Week, 10/31/07)
“Out-of-state online horse racing is illegal in most states. But in 1999, the Oregon Legislature made the state a national leader in multijurisdictional horse betting by making it legal for out-of-state gamblers to wager on races worldwide through Oregon-licensed advance deposit wagering companies, or ADWs. An ADW lets gamblers set up online accounts to bet. A gambler with a laptop in Siberia can bet on horse races in South Africa, and the electronic transfer could take place in Oregon.”

Analysis – PartyGaming seen as unlikely target for US casino players in coming years due to UIGEA, outstanding legal issues (Financial Times, 10/30/07)
“PartyGaming will only be a desirable target for potential US casino players in the coming years, a UK e-gaming executive said. Fall-out from the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act [UIGEA] and outstanding legal issues with the US department of Justice [DoJ] mean the UK-listed online gaming firm is unlikely to be attractive for US buyers for the next five to eight years, the executive said.”

Duplicate poker has arrived (The Desert Sun, 11/01/07)
“A final point is that I’m am not so sure that the “legalization” of online duplicate poker is a first step towards abolishment of the reprehensible UIGEA. In fact, it could be a setback, as it implies that regular poker is less a game of skill. And it clouds the real issue – not which variation of a game is being played, but our freedom to choose what we do in the privacy of our homes.”

Sin Cities on a Hill (Reason, 10/2006)
“How exactly did legal, overt, domesticated gambling become a standard feature of Main Street? Today in America, it’s actually easier to buy a lottery ticket than a Big Mac: There are more than 185,000 outlets where you can buy the former, only 13,700 that sell the latter. But does this mean the proliferation of legalized gambling has transformed us from productive, hard-working Puritans into incorrigible gluttons of chance? Or are we simply expressing appetites we’ve had all along?”

media:

Patrick Defends Casino Proposal (WCVR-TV, 10/31/07)

“Patrick’s bill would devote 2.5 percent of the gambling revenues collected by the state to fight addiction and other related problems, It would be the largest such fund in the country. The executive director of the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling, who welcomes the influx of cash, said you can’t ban something that 95 percent of the population has no problem with.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s