Headlines: Poker, Law, and Politics (09/17/07)

doyle_091707.jpg


articles:
The Caribbean Hold ‘Em (09/24/07, Newsweek)

Gambling issue still on the table (The News Tribune, 09/17/07)

Promoter hopes to bring poker to Milford (Nashua Telegraph, 09/17/07)

Pool sharks find new watering hole — and more — in Howell (Daily Press & Argus, 09/17/07)

Gambling in NH already big business (The Union-Leader, 09/16/07)

Patrick to offer 3-casino plan (The Boston Globe, 09/16/07)

Norwegian teenager becomes poker millionaire (Guardian Unlimited, 09/17/07)

Slot Player Held to Be Professional Gambler (Poker Player Newspaper, 09/17/07)

media:
Doyle Brunson speaks on UIGEA and HR 2046 (Poker After Dark, 09/14/07)

blog:
Here’s What Lawyers and Poker Players Have In Common: Interview with Steve Lubet (Poker Moments, 09/17/07)

excerpts:
The Caribbean Hold ‘Em (09/24/07, Newsweek)
“Antigua is better known for sandy beaches than international trade disputes. But next month this tiny Caribbean resort destination could compel the United States to legalize an industry that the Bush administration has been trying to eradicate since the beginning of the president’s first term. Antigua—with a population of just 70,000 and a GDP of under $1 billion—could force the United States to embrace online gambling.”

Gambling issue still on the table (The News Tribune, 09/17/07)
“Like a poker player trying to win the high hand and the low hand, the City of Lakewood is going both ways. It wants to hold on to its existing minicasinos and the steady revenue stream they bring in. But it keeps renewing a moratorium to keep all other gambling halls out. The stopgap plan isn’t honored by state authorities who license mini- casinos. State case law doesn’t allow local governments to say yes to some establishments and no to others, according to Washington State Gambling Commission officials.”

Promoter hopes to bring poker to Milford (Nashua Telegraph, 09/17/07)
“Poker players play for the pleasure of the game, not because they want to be do-gooders, says the president of a company that wants to establish a Texas hold’em poker operation in the former Violette’s IGA at the Granite Town Plaza. But if the planning board approves a change of use request made by James Rafferty, president of the New Hampshire Charitable Gambling, 35 percent of the profits from the games played in the former supermarket will go to charity.”

Pool sharks find new watering hole — and more — in Howell (Daily Press & Argus, 09/17/07)
“Puertas said the club may start charity Texas hold ’em poker tournaments, as the Shark Club in Waterford Township does. He said he may look for some charities to take part. By law, gambling is banned, but charities can conduct poker tournaments in which a portion of the entrance fees are awarded to the winners, and the rest is donated to the charity.”

Gambling in NH already big business (The Union-Leader, 09/16/07)
“State law on charity gambling events — such as Texas Hold’em poker tournaments — changed in 2006. Instead of local police chiefs and the Attorney General’s Office approving permits and gaming companies, oversight is now centralized at the Pari-Mutuel Commission. Chiefs were worried even before the law changed that charity games were getting a little out of hand. The commission is concerned, too. Since the change, “Texas Hold’em games have exploded,” Pari-Mutuel executive director Paul Kelley said. “You’ve got quite a bit of money moving around there.”

Patrick to offer 3-casino plan (The Boston Globe, 09/16/07)
“Governor Deval Patrick plans to propose as early as tomorrow that the state sell licenses for three full-scale resort casinos in Massachusetts, citing their potential to spur economic growth, create jobs, and generate new government revenue, according to State House officials who have been briefed on his plan. Patrick will recommend that the casinos be licensed in three regions: Southeastern Massachusetts, Western Massachusetts, and an area that includes Boston and points north, the officials said. His announcement will mark the culmination of months of study and the end of a long stretch of public silence on the subject of legalized gaming.”

Norwegian teenager becomes poker millionaire (Guardian Unlimited, 09/17/07)
“A teenager from a country where it is illegal to play live poker for money has become an overnight millionaire and broken a string of records by winning the main event at the World Series of Poker in London. Norwegian Annette Obrestad, 18, beat a string of professionals in a five-day £10,000 buy-in no-limit hold ’em event, winning a prize of £1 million, the biggest-ever single payday for a female player.”

Slot Player Held to Be Professional Gambler (Poker Player Newspaper, 09/17/07)
“A poker pro makes gambling a full-time business, meaning 35 or more hours a week, conducted in the same manner in which any other business is conducted, keeping records, etc., with a sincere belief that he or she will make a profit. I think the Minnesota case is another breakthrough for the growing legitimacy of legal gaming. But it also shows that determination can pay off. For Estelle Busch, 72 years old, represented herself in front of the Supreme Court of Minnesota. And she beat the Attorney General, Commissioner of Revenue and the State itself. Now that’s a player who knows her business.”

media:
Doyle Brunson speaks on UIGEA and HR 2046 (Poker After Dark, 09/14/07)

blog:
Here’s What Lawyers and Poker Players Have In Common: Interview with Steve Lubet (Poker Moments, 09/17/07)
“I’m always looking for new ways to teach lawyers, and it struck me that poker could provide some good analogies, so I bought a bunch of other poker books and began to research.  Almost immediately, I learned that the great advantage in poker is the constant repetition of a relatively limited number of situations.  In other words, the game is almost like a living social science experiment – high-stakes decision making based on incomplete information.  Lawyers do the same thing, so it made sense to look at common poker strategies and map them onto law practice.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s