Headlines: Poker, Law, and Politics (05/17/07)

articles:
House rejects poker bill (The Advocate, 05/17/07)


Poker hall proposal should stay off table (The Telegraph, 05/17/07)

Table-games suit should be dumped, state Lottery argues (The Charleston Gazette, 05/17/07)

Police arrest five in gambling operation (Potomac News, 05/17/07)

Opinion: We’ve debated the wrong thing (Georgetown News-Graphic, 05/17/07)

Why is America putting bettors at risk? (Covers.com, 05/16/07)

Gambling case brings call for special prosecutor (Press & Sun-Bulletin, 05/17/07)

Students find workarounds for online gambling laws (Diamond Back, 05/12/07)

excerpts:

House rejects poker bill (The Advocate, 05/17/07)
“The House rejected legislation Wednesday that would allow bars and restaurants to hold Texas hold ‘em poker tournaments. House Bill 484 by Rep. Warren Triche, D-Raceland, would prohibit the owners of bars and restaurants from handling the prize money or collecting an entry fee from players. Gov. Kathleen Blanco is opposed to the measure. She contends it would expand gambling.”

Poker hall proposal should stay off table (The Telegraph, 05/17/07)
“The Nashua Zoning Board of Adjustment tied 2-2 last week on votes to kill and to table a proposal to allow St. Stanislaus Hall on Pine Hill Road to become a poker parlor. Those tie votes mean the proposal for now is a no-go. The plan needs a majority vote in favor to go forward. A fifth member of the board, Rob Shaw, recused himself because of a potential conflict of interest. If an appeal is filed to re-hear the case, Shaw would have to again recuse himself”

Table-games suit should be dumped, state Lottery argues (The Charleston Gazette, 05/17/07)
“Arguing that state law and previous court decisions leave no question that state Lottery-regulated table games are constitutional, Lottery Commission attorneys asked the state Supreme Court Wednesday to throw out a conservative Christian organization’s challenge of the table-games law. The Lottery Commission attorneys said the lawsuit filed earlier this month by the West Virginia Family Foundation raises “irrelevant questions” about whether the Lottery can operate table games.”

Police arrest five in gambling operation (Potomac News, 05/17/07)
“Prince William County police busted a local gambling operation that raked in thousands of dollars and charged five people after receiving a tip from an informant last year, according to documents on file at Prince William County Circuit Court. The gambling ring was operated out of two business suites in Woodbridge that were fitted with sophisticated internal and external surveillance systems used to monitor police response, said Officer Erika Hernandez, Prince William police spokeswoman.”

Opinion: We’ve debated the wrong thing (Georgetown News-Graphic, 05/17/07)
“Legalization of casino gambling will not, upon introduction, spawn a whole new class of candidates for Gamblers Anonymous any more than service of liquor by the drink has increased alcoholism or DUI arrests in Georgetown. While it would bring a certain vice closer to home, the reality is that it is here already, and legalization would only serve to bring it out of the basements and garages and into the well-regulated light. It will also keep many Kentuckians off the highways to Indiana, Illinois and Ohio, and their dollars at home. The positive effect on Kentucky’s tax base and the concurrent ability of government to provide services in the form of roads, health care and education is almost incalculable.”

Why is America putting bettors at risk? (Covers.com, 05/16/07)
“Virtually all Internet gambling is illegal” under American law, U.S. Attorney Brett Tolman said in announcing the indictments. “Individuals and businesses that facilitate illegal Internet gambling are violating numerous federal and state laws. Payment processors who attempt to hide the true nature of the transactions they are conducting and the Internet gambling websites that use these payment processors will be prosecuted and brought to justice.” It’s hard to understand why the government is suddenly taking such a hardline stance against an industry that has existed in Britain, Australia and countless other countries for decades without tearing apart the social fiber of those nations.”

Gambling case brings call for special prosecutor (Press & Sun-Bulletin, 05/17/07)
“Mollen said Wednesday, after Michael W. Schafer’s press conference, that he had no intention of stepping down from the case. Mollen announced last week that his son, Michael, 24, was one of many participants who played in local poker games investigated by state police. But under New York law, it’s not a crime to play poker and Michael Mollen, along with many other local people who were poker players, did not commit a crime. Only those who made money from the games have been charged, including Anthony Capozzi, the former chairman of the Broome County Republican Committee.”

Students find workarounds for online gambling laws (Diamond Back, 05/12/07)
“According to Michael Osborne, executive director of the Compulsive Gambling Center in Baltimore, credit card companies are even making transactions look legitimate by recording them with generic titles on credit card bills. That way it is impossible to tell if the card was used at an online gambling site. The new methods, however, slow down the process, sometimes taking as long as a month and a half for students to cash out, where before the maximum was five days…”The online gambling ban is nothing but a farce,” Osborne said.”

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