Headlines: Poker, Law, and Politics (1/25/07)

daily_lobo1.jpg


articles:
Next for Pennsylvania: Putting Its Cards on the Table (Pittsburgh City Paper, 01/25/07)

Cops’ poker club hearing begins (Daily Record, 01/25/07)

Forget casinos, and card tables (The Plain Dealer, 01/25/07)

Bar owner charged in gambling sting (The Daily Herald, 01/25/07)

Sandstrom says he knows when to fold ’em (The Daily Herald [UT], 01/25/07)

Legislation makes poker political game (The Desert Sun, 01/25/07)

Dealing a hand to NM’s elite (New Mexico Daily Lobo, 01/25/07)

Teens gambling on future, survey says (Toronto Sun, 01/25/07)

Euro Poker News: The State of Poker in Holland (CardPlayer, 01/24/07)

blog:
A Not Very Simple Proposal (PokerStage, 01/25/07)

Screw The Man (Bill Rini, 01/24/07)

excerpt:
Next for Pennsylvania: Putting Its Cards on the Table (Pittsburgh City Paper, 01/25/07)
“It all starts the same way,” says Brokopp, a gambling author, handicapper and newspaper columnist from Chicago. “States need a new source of revenue, or they want to bail out their racetracks. They all seem to start with one facet of gambling — lottery or slots — and have no intention of expanding to anything else. But something always happens.”


Cops’ poker club hearing begins (Daily Record, 01/25/07)
“Suspended Roxbury Officer Thomas “TJ” Juskus agreed to a buyout of his share in an alleged illegal poker casino in Dover three days before it was raided in 2005, and township Sgt. Richard Winstock was trying to wriggle free of his ownership in the club, according to court testimony Wednesday.”

Forget casinos, and card tables (The Plain Dealer, 01/25/07)
“The days of the Friday night poker game when best friends sat in the kitchen hunched over a card table are fading. From Cleveland to Brunswick to Akron, 50 players and more — connected through amateur poker groups and the Internet — turn neighborhood basements into mini-casinos and play for thousands of dollars. Thanks to legal caveats and poker’s surging popularity, today’s home games take on a sophistication akin to organized sports.”

Bar owner charged in gambling sting (The Daily Herald, 01/25/07)
“Inside, officers found a three-table poker tournament in progress, as well as two illegal slot machines. Police Chief Cliff Metaxa said it was also common to find people playing dice at the bar, and the bar also operated sports betting pools. “Those kinds of things go on in bars across the county. It’s illegal,” Metaxa said. “The reason we’re here tonight is because this was so blatant.”

Sandstrom says he knows when to fold ’em (The Daily Herald [UT], 01/25/07)
“That’s the thrust of legislation considered Wednesday that would ban all forms of simulated gaming at Utah drinking establishments, even when no money is at stake. “You could go play Monopoly, I suppose,” said state Rep. Steve Sandstrom, R-Orem and the legislation’s sponsor. “But Texas Hold ‘Em is a no.” The House Business and Labor Committee decided to hold the bill. Some members were concerned that it would go too far in regulating the activities of adults.”

Legislation makes poker political game (The Desert Sun, 01/25/07)
“Poker is a democratic game. Whether you are male or female, young or old, rich or poor, black or white – it makes no difference at the poker table. If you like playing for pennies, thousands, or matchsticks, you can become a student of the game and improve your skill level. A truly American pastime, it’s been enjoyed by presidents, generals, Supreme Court Justices, members of Congress and average citizens for more than 150 years.”

Dealing a hand to NM’s elite (New Mexico Daily Lobo, 01/25/07)
“There’s a poker game where the players still call each other by last name, and some say a player has to die before another one can enter the game…About 20 accomplished New Mexicans, authors, and UNM deans and professors have been playing poker together since the 1960s. Stewart said this was their one private activity away from the media spotlight.”

Teens gambling on future, survey says (Toronto Sun, 01/25/07)
“The study, to be released today, was done by the Responsible Gambling Council, a non-profit organization trying to stop problem gambling. Of the 2,140 teens surveyed, 34.9% said they’re already gambling. Of those, 40% said poker is their game of choice, while another 36% admitted to regularly buying raffle tickets, including scratch-and-win lottery tickets.”

Euro Poker News: The State of Poker in Holland (CardPlayer, 01/24/07)
“The situation in the Netherlands seems to be getting grimmer by the week. Where, on one side, we had huge successes with the Master Classics of Poker only a few months ago, on the other side, law enforcers thought it necessary yet again to raid a small home tournament. This was already the second time in a month — see last month’s issue of Card Player Europe — and it seems the Dutch Justice Department wants to scare the recreational poker player thoroughly. ”

blog:
A Not Very Simple Proposal (PokerStage, 01/25/07)
“Now, in the winter of our discontent, it’s time to stop talking. Some small number of people have expressed agreement with my proposal to fix the UIGEA problem (the problem, of course, is the very existence of this onerous restriction on our personal freedom). Of course, as poker players, we are a sedentary lot. No where is the principle of Newton’s First Law in greater effect than in the hearts of the American people.”

Screw The Man (Bill Rini, 01/24/07)
“As my good amigo FhwrdH pointed out, this is like the boiling frog treatment. Okay they closed Neteller, I’ll just go to Click2Pay. Oh Party pulled out of the market, that’s okay ’cause I’ll just play on Stars. No! No! Don’t you get it?!? That glass half full attitude is what is going to guarantee that by the time the DOJ can land the fatal blow that the industry will be so scattered and weak and the players so unorganized that there will be almost no resistance.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s