Headlines: Poker, Law, and Politics (04/03/08)

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Selected Coverage of UIGEA Hearing (04/02/08)

articles:
Feds Say Internet Gambling Law Ambiguous (Associated Press, 04/02/08)

Jeff Haney reports that the legal fight over a law that virtually outlaws Internet gambling in the U.S. isn’t over (Las Vegas Sun, 04/02/08)

Playing Their Hands on the Hill (The Washington Post, 04/02/08)

Poker gaining players and fans in Tucson (The Arizona Daily Star, 04/02/08 – AZ)

Where it’s legal, and where it isn’t (The Arizona Daily Star, 04/03/08 – AZ)

Poker has a dark side, too — addiction (The Arizona Daily Star, 04/02/03 – AZ)

Texas Hold ‘Em brings together young, old (The Champion, 04/02/08 – PA)

5 questions for gambling guru (Concord Monitor, 04/02/08 – NH)

High limit poker comes to Northern Quest Casino (KHQ, 04/01/08 – WA)

Poker bill could mean longer gaming hours (Miami Herald, 04/02/08 – FL)

Gubernatorial candidate: I fold (Tri-City Herald, 04/01/08 – WA)

media:
Capitol Hill debates online poker regulations (MSNBC, 04/02/08)

excerpts:

Feds Say Internet Gambling Law Ambiguous (Associated Press, 04/02/08)
“Congress’ ban on Internet gambling is so vague that figuring out how to enforce it is a struggle, say federal officials charged with the task. “I think it is very difficult without having more of a bright line about what is intended to be unlawful Internet gambling,” Louise Roseman, head of the Federal Reserve’s bank operations division, told a House hearing Wednesday.”

Jeff Haney reports that the legal fight over a law that virtually outlaws Internet gambling in the U.S. isn’t over (Las Vegas Sun, 04/02/08)
“The lobbying group iMEGA (Interactive Media Entertainment & Gaming Association) is proceeding with full force in its fight against the federal law that has shackled the growth of Internet poker and other forms of online gambling in the United States. The group filed notice Tuesday in the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that it will challenge the recent dismissal of its lawsuit opposing the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006.”

Playing Their Hands on the Hill (The Washington Post, 04/02/08)
“Is it government business if consenting adults, in the privacy of their own home, decide to play …poker? Andy Bloch says no. “It’s like sex, without the sex,” said the professional card player, who came to D.C. with 2000 World Series of Poker Main Event champ Chris “Jesus” Ferguson to lobby against a 2006 law that restricts online poker games. The pros spent two days on Capitol Hill and dropped by Reason magazine Tuesday night to talk about the politics of poker.”

Poker gaining players and fans in Tucson (The Arizona Daily Star, 04/02/08 – AZ)
“Chris Moneymaker was a mild-mannered accountant in Tennessee when he spent $40 to enter an Internet poker tournament. Before he was done, he’d won $2.5 million in the 2003 World Series of Poker (the first tourney he’d ever played in a casino) — giving the hundreds of thousands who watched on ESPN something to shoot for. “I think anyone who comes in this room thinks, yeah, that could be me,” said 40-year-old Fran Lieberman, who sat waiting for a tournament to begin in the poker room at Casino del Sol last month. “Who wouldn’t?”

Where it’s legal, and where it isn’t (The Arizona Daily Star, 04/03/08 – AZ)
“Poker has moved from shady back rooms into the mainstream, becoming more socially acceptable along the way. It’s also one of the many forms of gambling that is legal in Arizona. Poker at casinos falls within the state’s gaming compact with Indian tribes, which was updated and expanded in a 2002 voter referendum. Poker played by adults in homes or in bars and restaurants is legal as “social gambling.” But wagers can be used only for the prize pool and for operating costs.”

Poker has a dark side, too — addiction (The Arizona Daily Star, 04/02/03 – AZ)
“All those big-money poker tournaments on television have introduced countless people to the excitement of Texas hold’em. But the dark side of poker’s popularity is a rise in gambling addiction, according to Jeff Friedman, a therapist at Cottonwood de Tucson.”

Texas Hold ‘Em brings together young, old (The Champion, 04/02/08 – PA)
“Every Tuesday night Mike Holm – and about 35 other area residents – play poker at the Sports Zone in Harrisburg. For two years now, the bar has hosted a poker league every Tuesday night at 7 and 9 p.m. Participants take their chances on Texas Hold ‘Em, the ever-growing version of poker now a presence on television and in plenty of bars and home poker tables in the U.S.”

5 questions for gambling guru (Concord Monitor, 04/02/08 – NH)
“Next week, a semi-retired gambling guru will debate a priest and professor on the pros and cons of expanding gambling in New Hampshire. The event starts at 3:45 at Room 120 of UNH’s Spaulding Hall and features James Rafferty on the pro side and Richard McGowan on the con. We checked in with Rafferty, who spent a career in casinos, now heads up a charitable poker operation in Milford and teaches a class at UNH.”

High limit poker comes to Northern Quest Casino (KHQ, 04/01/08 – WA)
“Northern Quest Casino has become the first casino in the Inland Northwest to offer high-limit poker games, casino officials announced Tuesday. “To serious poker players, it means for the first time they’ll be allowed to play Hold’em with a betting limit of up to $500 per bet with three raises,” said Janet Chavez, Poker Room Supervisor.”

Poker bill could mean longer gaming hours (Miami Herald, 04/02/08 – FL)
“Poker rooms could stay open later and dormant jai-alai frontons could become greyhound racetracks under two bills that won approval from a Senate committee Tuesday. The poker bill paves the way for high-stakes and celebrity tournaments at parimutuels and would expand gaming to 18 hours a day on weekdays and 24 hours a day on weekends. Current law allows card rooms to operate for no more than 12 hours a day.”

Gubernatorial candidate: I fold (Tri-City Herald, 04/01/08 – WA)
“Renton attorney and poker enthusiast Lee Rousso has folded his Democratic gubernatorial campaign without ever showing his cards but it wasn’t Gov. Chris Gregoire who flopped the winning hand. In Rousso’s book it was the U.S. Supreme Court that doomed his campaign when it upheld Washington’s top-two primary. You may recall from our earlier report that Rousso thought he could knock Gregoire out by using the state’s pick-a-party primary. Under that scenario he figured he could land as much as 20 percent of the Democratic vote, get support for the Libertarians and then appeal to Republicans to pick a Democratic ballot and vote for him.”

media:
Capitol Hill debates online poker regulations (MSNBC, 04/02/08)

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One response to “Headlines: Poker, Law, and Politics (04/03/08)

  1. When is this all going to get sorted out in America? How come some websites like Full Tilt and Poker Stars are still accepting in the US? and other sites like Party can’t do anything.

    I’m wondering whether it is still worth marketing to Americans with my website or focus more in Europe.

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