Headlines: Poker, Law, and Politics (12/06/07)

articles:
Skill Game Exemption Act For UIGEA Gains 20th Co-Sponsor (Casino Gambling Web, 12/06/07)

Going all-in: Gambling is already big business in New Hampshire (The Hippo, 12/06/07)

Casino entry cards: ID or not ID? (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 12/06/07)

House passes gambling bill (Saipan Tribune, 12/06/07)

excerpts:

Skill Game Exemption Act For UIGEA Gains 20th Co-Sponsor (Casino Gambling Web, 12/06/07)
“Currently there are at least four bills in the House of Representatives that attempt to address the bad decision that congress made last year when it enacted the UIGEA. Rep. Robert Wexler of Florida’s 19th District in June introduced bill H.R.2610 that would exempt ‘skill games’ from the UIGEA. Skill games mentioned are chess, backgammon, mahjong and poker. Yesterday, Rep. Robert E. Andrews [NJ-1] became the 20th congressman to endorse this bill.”

Going all-in: Gambling is already big business in New Hampshire (The Hippo, 12/06/07)
“In states where gambling is legal, there are two parties involved: the player and the casino. In New Hampshire, however, gambling is only allowed if a minimum of 35 percent of the revenue is given directly to a charitable organization, said Paul Kelley, president of the state’s Pari-Mutuel office, which was created in the 1930s to license and regulate gambling at the state’s dog tracks. In 2005, bingo and lucky seven games were re-aligned to fall under the auspices of the commission, as were charitable gambling events.”

Casino entry cards: ID or not ID? (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 12/06/07)
“Smith, who represents St. Louis, is facing criminal charges for using a card assigned to another legislator to play poker at a casino in Boonville this summer. The case highlights a device both gamblers and gaming executives bemoan as an inconvenience unique to Missouri. Though the cards might be here to stay — they are tied to the state’s “loss limit” rule — Smith’s lawyer is challenging whether gamblers need to identify themselves before entering a casino.”

House passes gambling bill (Saipan Tribune, 12/06/07)
“The bill proposes an annual license fee of $1.5 million on the first 30 poker tables for each approved location, plus $50,000 for each additional table. Each specific location can have up to 40 poker tables. In addition, an annual license fee of $50,000 is proposed for each black jack and or baccarat table licensed for operation with the approved poker games. The bill would impose a special gaming tax of 20 percent on the net gaming proceeds of any licensed activity.”

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